Tam, Kwok-kan

 

Tam, Kwok-kan

譚國根

Kwok-kan Tam is Chair Professor and Dean of Arts and Social Sciences at the Open University of Hong Kong. Prior to joining the Open University, he was Professor in English at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, where he had also served as Trustee and Fellow of Shaw College, Chairman of the English Department, Head of the Graduate Division of English, and Director of Comparative Literature Research Programme.

He obtained his PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has received numerous research grants in the US and Asia. He was awarded a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship by the East-West Center through worldwide open competition in 1984. In the 1990s, he won two other fellowships for research at the East-West Center. His research in Asian literature in English also won him an ASAIHL Fellowship in 1998. He has been Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo, University of Tokyo, Sophia University, and Zhongnan University of Economics and Law, China. He is Fellow of the Gender Research Centre at Dalian University and at Capital Normal University, and Advisory Fellow of the Comparative Literature Research Centre at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He has served on the editorial board of many international journals and book series.

He is internationally acknowledged for his pioneering studies on Henrik Ibsen, Gao Xingjian, gender in modern Chinese literature, Asianization of English, and cultural globalization. He has published more than a hundred book chapters and journal articles, as well as 13 books which include Ibsen and the Modern Self (2010), Englishization in Asia (2009), English and Globalization: Perspectives from Hong Kong and Mainland China (2004), Anglophone Cultures in Southeast Asia (2003), Sights of Contestation: Localism, Globalism and Cultural Production in Asia and the Pacific (2002), Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian (2001), Ibsen in China 1908-1997: A Critical-Annotated Bibliography of Criticism, Translation and Performance (2001), Politics of Subject Construction in Modern Chinese Literature (2000), and New Chinese Cinema (1998).