So, Jenny

 

So, Jenny

Jenny F. So has been Chair Professor of Fine Arts at CUHK since 2008, and Director, Institute of Chinese Studies at CUHK 2002-2009. She received her B.A. in English Literature from Swarthmore College, PA and M.A. and Ph.D. in Chinese art history from Harvard University. She specializes in the art of ancient China (Neolithic to early centuries CE), and methodology in art-historical research. Before returning to CUHK, she was Senior Curator of Chinese Art at The Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Her research focuses mainly on the art and archaeology from the pre-historic period through the Bronze Age, Chinese jades from all ages i.e. prehistoric through twentieth century, issues in archaism (in bronzes and jades, not painting and calligraphy) throughout China’s art history, and problems of artistic and cultural exchange between China and beyond from antiquity through medieval and later periods. Her earlier landmark publications include Eastern Zhou Ritual Bronzes in the Arthur M. Sackler Collections (1995); Traders and Raiders on China’s Northern Frontier (1995); and Music in the Age of Confucius (2000). More recently, she has explored in depth issues about Chinese jade from the Neolithic to medieval periods in a number of articles such as “Jades from Niuheliang: Answers to an Archaeological Problem?” in Zurich Studies in the History of Art: Georges Bloch Annual (2009); “Exploring Ancient Sichuan’s Cultural Contacts: Evidence from Jade and Stone” in Proceedings of the Symposium on New Frontiers in Global Archaeology (2008); “Jade and Stone at Sanxingdui” in Ancient Sichuan: Treasures from a Lost Civilization (2001); on issues in archaism throughout Chinese history in “Antiques in Antiquity: Early Chinese Looks at the Past” in Journal of Chinese Studies (2008); “Finding Paradigms among Northern Sung Jades” in Proceedings on Conference on Founding Paradigms: Art and Culture of the Northern Sung Dynasty (2008); and artistic and cultural exchange between China and its neighbours in Noble Riders from Pines and Deserts: The Artistic Legacy of the Qidan (2004). Two books – one in Chinese and one in English - that will examine in a holistic manner the role and significance of jade in Chinese culture are in progress.