Pfister, Lauren

 

Pfister, Lauren

費樂仁

Having served in Hong Kong Baptist University since 1987, Lauren Pfister is now professor in the Philosophy and Religion Department, and will serve as the Head of that Department starting in the Fall 2011. Previous to coming to Hong Kong he taught in Christian seminaries in the Philippines and Hawai’i, providing lectures in biblical languages, ethics, church history and comparative religious studies. His MDiv (1978) was presented by Denver Seminary (Denver, Colorado, USA) under the mentorship of the theologian, Gordon Lewis, a MA in philosophy being earned at San Diego State University (1982) with a thesis written on a philosophical theme in modern Jewish-Christian dialogue, written under the guidance of the Buberian scholar, Maurice Friedman. Subsequently, his PhD in comparative philosophy (1987) was taken with a Chinese philosophical emphasis, his dissertation chairman being the critical modern Ruist scholar, Prof. Cheng Chung-Ying成中英, at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa.

He is also a Distinguished Adjunct Researcher for the Institute for Promoting Chinese Language and Culture at Renmin University in Beijing, a Researcher at the Institute for Chinese Philosophy and Culture at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and has been an Associate Editor for the Journal of Chinese Philosophy since 1997. In his written work he has maintained a consistent interest in comparative religious and comparative philosophical studies, with strong foci on the study and evaluation of Sino-Christian and Ruist (“Confucian”) traditions. Over the years he has maintained interest in hermeneutic questions related to classical translation studies in European and Chinese cultural contexts, particularly those arising from the study of modern missionary-scholar texts (particularly those produced by James Legge理雅各, Richard Wilhlem衛禮賢, and Séraphin Couvreur顧賽芬) in Chinese and foreign languages; he has also written about many questions related to contemporary accounts of the history of Chinese philosophical traditions. Major works have been produced on James Legge, including his two volume work on Striving for “The Whole Duty of Man” in two volumes (2004), and contributing critical introductory essays for the republication of Legge’s famous five-volume set, The Chinese Classics (2nd edition, 1893-1895), republished by the East China Normal University Press in 2011. Conceptually he has contributed to the understanding of the “transformative dimension” (2008) and “post-secularity” (2011), applying these specifically to Chinese cultural contexts.